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davidh
July 24th, 2005, 03:36 PM
While wasting time browsing in Borders a couple weeks ago I saw a book about Ireland that claimed on the book jacket that the monks in Ireland were the main or one of the main preservers of ancient classical writings. Elsewhere I have read claims that Arab and Muslim scholars preserved and translated most of the classic writings and served as a source of their re-introduction into Western Europe.

So... what are the politically correct, politically incorrect, and true stories, etc. on this subject?

BTW do current in-print editions of the Larousse dictionary/encyclopedia still have section of pink pages in the middle with a lot of Latin sayings, etc.

David H.

Judy G. Russell
July 24th, 2005, 03:44 PM
While wasting time browsing in Borders a couple weeks ago I saw a book about Ireland that claimed on the book jacket that the monks in Ireland were the main or one of the main preservers of ancient classical writings. Elsewhere I have read claims that Arab and Muslim scholars preserved and translated most of the classic writings and served as a source of their re-introduction into Western Europe.
I'd read that both were critical in preserving writings and materials in the dark ages. IOW, it ain't an either-or.

davidh
July 24th, 2005, 03:54 PM
I'd read that both were critical in preserving writings and materials in the dark ages. IOW, it ain't an either-or. I wonder if the texts they favored for preservation depended mostly just on which manuscripts happened to be available locally or if there was some local cultural favoritism e.g. gaelic cultural influence in Ireland or maybe Farsi/Syrian/Aramaic cultural influence in Baghdad, etc.?

Judy G. Russell
July 24th, 2005, 03:59 PM
I wonder if the texts they favored for preservation depended mostly just on which manuscripts happened to be available locally or if there was some local cultural favoritism e.g. gaelic cultural influence in Ireland or maybe Farsi/Syrian/Aramaic cultural influence in Baghdad, etc.?
I suspect (mere suspicion here and no hard facts to support it) that availability was the key: what the Irish monasteries had in their possession, what the Arabs had available to them, what they were able to acquire over the years.

davidh
July 24th, 2005, 04:10 PM
I suspect (mere suspicion here and no hard facts to support it) that availability was the key: what the Irish monasteries had in their possession, what the Arabs had available to them, what they were able to acquire over the years.

"Cancellation of the International Summer Arts Festival events

Alexandria, 24 July 2005—In solidarity with the Egyptian public’s mourning over the recent events that took place in Sharm El Sheikh, the Bibliotheca Alexandrina has cancelled its events of..."

Bibliotheca Alexandrina
http://www.bibalex.org/English/index.aspx

<tears>

Judy G. Russell
July 24th, 2005, 05:35 PM
<tears> for sure.

Dick K
July 25th, 2005, 01:52 AM
BTW do current in-print editions of the Larousse dictionary/encyclopedia still have section of pink pages in the middle with a lot of Latin sayings, etc..?Yup; they are called the pages roses, and they are a French institution .

Nick Parkin
July 27th, 2005, 03:27 PM
At the time that Western Christians were going through a barbaric burn the books & kill the infidels phase Islam was a very tolerant, sophisticated, and educated society. They preserved the ancient Greek philosophies, and tolerated other religions such as the Jews. The Jews flourished in Moorish Spain, until the Christians conquered & invented the Spanish Inquisition.