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View Full Version : DTP Forum has a Facebook page


ktinkel
February 7th, 2009, 10:37 AM
As an experiment, the DTP Forum has a page (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Desktop-Publishing-Forum/127320980547) on Facebook. Please drop by and become a fan. You can also post photos there.

More than that I cannot say because I actually do not understand it well enough, but it does seem popular. :eek:

And we would love to see you there.

Judy G. Russell
February 7th, 2009, 03:39 PM
And we would love to see you there.I don't do Facebook. That whole social networking scene never caught on with me.

ktinkel
February 8th, 2009, 10:12 AM
I don't do Facebook. That whole social networking scene never caught on with me.Me, neither, but it is interesting, if odd. I am sure it is a generational thing, and quite antithetical to the dry logic of forums.

We have a page with links to the forum for now. And people who like to post photos can do it there.

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2009, 03:30 PM
I am sure it is a generational thing, and quite antithetical to the dry logic of forums.Agreed, and I am now firmly ensconced in the older (forum) generation.

Mike
February 10th, 2009, 02:32 AM
Yeah, I keep getting invitations from people, and I just don't understand the attraction.

Judy G. Russell
February 10th, 2009, 08:33 AM
Yeah, I keep getting invitations from people, and I just don't understand the attraction.Same here. I don't really get how the whole thing is supposed to work, or why!

ktinkel
February 10th, 2009, 10:06 AM
Yeah, I keep getting invitations from people, and I just don't understand the attraction.Honestly, there isnít too much attraction for the system (except among those who have grown up with it, perhaps). But there is considerable interest in some of the content.

The main draw ó what got me there in the first place ó is that all of our honorary grandchildren are celebrated there. Instead of waiting for a formal or organized (or at least clean-face) portrait at birthdays or Christmas we can see them doing all sorts of things (mostly growing). And get fleeting notice of what their parents are up to.

Second, I run into old friends (more than on LinkedIn, oddly). It is nice to touch base that way.

Third, it gives our forum a photo album setup (which some of our members like) that doesnít drain our bandwidth or plug up the server (unlike the lame one in the newer versions of vB).

And it is a modest sort of advertisement of the DTP forumís existence, though I have yet to discover whether anyone on Facebook is interested!

But it is unlikely ever to supplant the forum for the likes of me (or you, or others here).

Judy G. Russell
February 10th, 2009, 10:58 PM
The main draw ó what got me there in the first place ó is that all of our honorary grandchildren are celebrated there. Instead of waiting for a formal or organized (or at least clean-face) portrait at birthdays or Christmas we can see them doing all sorts of things (mostly growing). And get fleeting notice of what their parents are up to.Now that's something I hadn't really considered, but you're right on that.

Lindsey
February 11th, 2009, 12:05 AM
I don't do Facebook. That whole social networking scene never caught on with me.

I'm so relieved that I am not the only one...

Judy G. Russell
February 11th, 2009, 10:24 AM
I'm so relieved that I am not the only one...You and I are in the last generation to grow up truly believing we SHOULD keep private things private. My nieces and nephews think nothing about putting some of the most amazingly private aspects of their lives out there for anybody to see. I'd never be comfortable with that -- the forum style is as "out there" as I want to be on most things.

ktinkel
February 11th, 2009, 11:18 AM
Now that's something I hadn't really considered, but you're right on that.And the place seems to be crawling with genealogy people.

ktinkel
February 11th, 2009, 11:19 AM
I'm so relieved that I am not the only one...Hardly. <g>

ktinkel
February 11th, 2009, 11:23 AM
You and I are in the last generation to grow up truly believing we SHOULD keep private things private. My nieces and nephews think nothing about putting some of the most amazingly private aspects of their lives out there for anybody to see. I'd never be comfortable with that -- the forum style is as "out there" as I want to be on most things.No need to say anything you donít want to.

There are many little games and doodads aimed at getting people to reveal all; most of them take my breath away, and I just ignore them. One popular one lately is a call to list 25 things others do not know about you. I have seen some of those lists (many but not all from younger people) mentioning all sorts of stuff that should remain private, imho.

But no need to join in.

Judy G. Russell
February 11th, 2009, 04:53 PM
And the place seems to be crawling with genealogy people.Really? I may have to check it out just on that basis!

Judy G. Russell
February 11th, 2009, 04:55 PM
There are many little games and doodads aimed at getting people to reveal all; most of them take my breath away, and I just ignore them. One popular one lately is a call to list 25 things others do not know about you. I have seen some of those lists (many but not all from younger people) mentioning all sorts of stuff that should remain private, imho.I can't imagine why young people feel that there is no downside to public exposure of all kinds of intensely private facts. Any more than I can understand young teachers posting photos of themselves drinking to excess, or a job applicant we got who wrote on his website that he hated Newark and was only looking for a job there to tide himself over until he got one in a location he liked better. Do they simply not realize that employers and others LOOK at what they do and say out there???

ktinkel
February 11th, 2009, 08:40 PM
I can't imagine why young people feel that there is no downside to public exposure of all kinds of intensely private facts. Any more than I can understand young teachers posting photos of themselves drinking to excess, or a job applicant we got who wrote on his website that he hated Newark and was only looking for a job there to tide himself over until he got one in a location he liked better. Do they simply not realize that employers and others LOOK at what they do and say out there???I have no idea. It is amazing.

Lindsey
February 11th, 2009, 10:13 PM
You and I are in the last generation to grow up truly believing we SHOULD keep private things private. My nieces and nephews think nothing about putting some of the most amazingly private aspects of their lives out there for anybody to see. I'd never be comfortable with that -- the forum style is as "out there" as I want to be on most things.

I think you're right about that; it remains to be seen whether or not they have cause to regret telling everybody everything later in life. Prospective employers have been known to do web searches on applicants. (And I wouldn't be surprised if some didn't do it with current employees!) I'm not sure it's such a good idea to have so much stuff out there for them to find, especially in the current economic climate.

Lindsey
February 11th, 2009, 10:21 PM
And the place seems to be crawling with genealogy people.

I can see where it would be a wonderful contact tool for genealogy enthusiasts, but that's a two-edged sword as well. Making your information easy to share also makes it easy to appropriate, and it's not that I feel so proprietary about about what I have, it's that sometimes what you think you know proves to be wrong, and once it's been shared all over the Internet, just try getting it corrected! Also, the old CompuServe ROOTS also had a problem with someone coming through and downloading all of the GEDCOM files that forum members had uploaded to share with each other and then putting them on CDs to sell commercially.

So--these days, I'm happy to share information with people who ask me for it, or to offer it privately to someone who seems to be looking for information I have, but I always ask when I give it to them not to circulate it without checking with me first, so that I have a chance to correct or clarify it if necessary before it gets passed on.

Lindsey
February 11th, 2009, 10:22 PM
Hardly. <g>

I'm afraid I have entered the old fogey stage of life. :(

Lindsey
February 11th, 2009, 10:24 PM
I can't imagine why young people feel that there is no downside to public exposure of all kinds of intensely private facts. Any more than I can understand young teachers posting photos of themselves drinking to excess, or a job applicant we got who wrote on his website that he hated Newark and was only looking for a job there to tide himself over until he got one in a location he liked better. Do they simply not realize that employers and others LOOK at what they do and say out there???

Ah! There you go, that's what I was just saying in a reply I just posted.

Judy G. Russell
February 12th, 2009, 12:05 AM
I think you're right about that; it remains to be seen whether or not they have cause to regret telling everybody everything later in life. Prospective employers have been known to do web searches on applicants. (And I wouldn't be surprised if some didn't do it with current employees!) I'm not sure it's such a good idea to have so much stuff out there for them to find, especially in the current economic climate.You and I are clearly on the same wavelength here. And there is no doubt at all that there are serious consequences to this. There are stories all over the place of people losing jovs and more because of what they posted online. See here (http://media.www.waltonian.com/media/storage/paper752/news/2007/09/26/News/How-Facebook.Got.Me.Fired-2993434.shtml) and here (http://www.policeone.com/police-technology/articles/1776582-Two-Wash-officers-fired-over-Facebook-indiscretions/) just as two examples.

ktinkel
February 12th, 2009, 10:31 AM
I doubt you would ever want to post in public in Facebook ó or at all, even in the e-mail-sort of thing if you want to keep control of the information.

But it is a place to meet people, most of whom use their real names, and if you find someone with mutual interests you could probably arrange to move the conversation to proper e-mail.

ktinkel
February 12th, 2009, 10:38 AM
I'm afraid I have entered the old fogey stage of life. :(I have the same feeling. I just treated myself to an iPod, my first such object in any format (never even a Sony Walkman before).

It is not because I want to run around with thingies in my ears (in fact I really dislike that) but because I want an easy way to have controllable music in the bedroom, which is not accessible to our wi-fi. So I also got a dock/player.

I got this thing yesterday, copied some music over to it via iTunes, and couldnít get a sound out of it. I kept reading various bits of information and fiddling with it, and all of a sudden, the iPod from its dock/player began to work. Was quite nice. But then I discovered that I could not turn it off. So I eventually got up, turned off the player, and went to sleep.

Got up this morning, picked up the iPod, and it was still running. I still have no idea how to stop it, but I have the manual, so guess I will figure it out.

I also ordered a Kindle, which is due Feb. 26. Wonder how mysterious that will turn out to be!

Every child in American can manage these doodads, but I seem to be flummoxed by them!

Mike
February 13th, 2009, 01:59 AM
Every child in American can manage these doodads, but I seem to be flummoxed by them!
But not every child in America can use "flummoxed" in a sentence!

ktinkel
February 13th, 2009, 09:35 AM
But not every child in America can use "flummoxed" in a sentence!:D

Judy G. Russell
February 13th, 2009, 12:52 PM
Every child in American can manage these doodads, but I seem to be flummoxed by them!Did you learn to use a sliderule? Can you imagine what today's kids would think of that!?!?

ktinkel
February 13th, 2009, 01:42 PM
Did you learn to use a sliderule? Can you imagine what today's kids would think of that!?!?Of course! I used to demo them for the Keuffel & Esser company in San Francisco. I was a regular slide rule whiz. (I doubt I am today, though.)

But slide rules are logical. iPods? Not really. At least, the logic is not apparent to me. You just poke and stroke and hope for the best.

Judy G. Russell
February 13th, 2009, 05:21 PM
.slide rules are logical. iPods? Not really. At least, the logic is not apparent to me. You just poke and stroke and hope for the best.Unfortunately, I also have to agree with you in the iPod. I love mine, and I love my iPhone too (though I have a few choice words for the dropped-call "feature" offered by AT&T these days!). But where all of the controls of the iPhone are simple, the iPod often leaves me howling with frustration.

ktinkel
February 13th, 2009, 08:14 PM
Ö the iPod often leaves me howling with frustration.Whew! What a relief ó itís not just me, then.

Judy G. Russell
February 13th, 2009, 08:36 PM
Whew! What a relief ó itís not just me, then.Nope, definitely NOT just you.