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Guerri Stevens
June 14th, 2005, 07:24 PM
I think David Harper recommended this (don't know how to address a public message to an individual).

I notice that sometimes when AVG scans incoming Email it not only inserts the message about the mail being virus free, but also adds an attachment that says the same thing. I haven't checked, but I think it does this (for me) only with mail from Yahoo.

Anybody know why, and whether it can be fixed?

davidh
June 14th, 2005, 10:11 PM
I use AVG but I shut off the email virus checking.

I had problems with Norton AV email proxy checking for viruses years ago and got scared of such.

I used the AVG "Control Center" to do the shut off. Don't remember the details, but it wasn't too hard.

I think my sister is using AVG virus checker on her Mozilla email. but I can't remember for sure. At least she hasn't complained so far and asked me to fix her setup.

I use an obsolete 16bit Windows email program and I don't know if it would work with AVG or not. Certainly TAPCIS would have no hooks for AVG to grab onto.

David H.

Bill Hirst
June 15th, 2005, 12:14 PM
I think David Harper recommended this (don't know how to address a public message to an individual).

I notice that sometimes when AVG scans incoming Email it not only inserts the message about the mail being virus free, but also adds an attachment that says the same thing. I haven't checked, but I think it does this (for me) only with mail from Yahoo.

Anybody know why, and whether it can be fixed?

There are several check boxes in the AVG email configuration. {AVG control center\ E-mail scanner\ Configuration. } I have mine set to "[x] check incoming mail", but the box for "[ ] certify mail" is not checked. That way it checks the mail, but doesn't add a message. But even without e-mail scanning, the resident AVG virus checker would give an alert when anything nasty was opened, and also find any infection during the scheduled system scans.

MollyM/CA
June 15th, 2005, 01:48 PM
Practically everything you put in your computer these days has an e-mail virus check, and they're "on" by default. Could this be some weird conflict?

My solution is to use Mailwasher, delete spam from all the mailboxes (you can set MW to read almost any amount of the messages), and when I have downloaded the good mail be cautious about clicking on links in mail from known dopes.

By the way, AVG (Grisoft) has a new combined antivirus/firewall program in Beta and I installed it on the laptop and like it very much --but of course don't yet know how effective the firewall is! It seems a little easier to figure out than Outpost (Agnitum) and isn't in your face nearly as much. As a Beta it's free so far (and has caused no problems that I know of).

m

Nick Parkin
June 16th, 2005, 03:08 AM
I use AVG & have it check my mail, & I have found it fantastic, I thoroughly recommend it. :) I have the "checked stamp" active on incoming mail but not outgoing, so I don't annoy others but that I have the reassurance that AVG has updated itself (it always does). To set things right click on the system tray icon, launch control center, click properties button bottom right.

For Firewall - I believe Outpost is best, but for me it kept crashing XP, so I used Zone Alarm, which used to interfere with my network (probably my fault in not setting it up right) so I shelled out for a Firewall/Router (prices have plummeted) & have never looked back.

For security checking I use https://grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2 & Spybot, & have just discovered http://www.gfi.com/lannetscan/lanscanfreeware.htm

Actually I no longer get Viruses since I managed to banish Spam from my life, & I commend to everyone the system that has worked for me, though I have to say it only works with POP Mail. But as it uses the OLR approach, I think Tapcis users will relate to it. Spam used to be a problem, & with it came Viruses & Trojans so:

1) I created a new mail account, which I only give out to personal & business contacts. Outlook collects mail every 10 mins (I am on Broadband). I just don't get spam on this account. Well, very occasionally. Outlook's spam filter is about 80% effective on that.

2) Any website, newletter, or form filling gets the Spam address. Outlook is set up to only collect mail from this account when the Send button (F9) is pressed. Even then - it only collects headers, which I then mark for deletion knowing that they are spam. Why bother collecting the mail? - well 1stly there are a couple of Newsletters that I occasionally want to read, so I DO download them, but mainly for those times when I've forgotten my password at a website. I clear the mailbox, then request the password, then download the mail again to get the password.

It works for me :D Just to give you an idea, I get about 1/2 spam/week on the mail account (dictionary spam) & about 400/Day on the spam account

Guerri Stevens
June 16th, 2005, 10:00 PM
Thanks for the information on the "certify" feature. I just turned it off and will see what happens.

After posting my original message, I found that messages from sites other than Yahoo were getting the attachment.

fhaber
June 17th, 2005, 09:05 AM
I really think you guys should throw Grisoft a bone. Fercryingoutloud, AVG7 Pro is only, what, $34 for **two years***? You get blindingly fast, troublefree update from an uncrowded server in return.

I've had minor stability problems with AVG 7 on 98 machines in the module that scans outbound mail. Consider not installing that. Turning things on and off in AVG once they're installed is, well, less than intuitive.

These problems have eased considerably with the last couple of "core" updates. Tip: manually update occasionally. If you see "recommended" and "optional" updates further down the box, choose the bottom one. You may have to reboot. These tuneups seem useful and benign so far, unlike those of some other vendors I could name (spit, curse).

MollyM/CA
June 17th, 2005, 09:32 PM
I really think you guys should throw Grisoft a bone. Fercryingoutloud, AVG7 Pro is only, what, $34 for **two years***? You get blindingly fast, troublefree update from an uncrowded server in return.

I think I paid a little more than that, and I'm sure I'll be asked to shell out a fair amount for the combination firewall and virus program. Wonder if they'll prorate... I just renewed AVG on the desktop.

And yes, the daily updating is marvelous. Truly in the background and makes me feel really secure.


Turning things on and off in AVG once they're installed is, well, less than intuitive.

The interface is getting easier to figure out all the time. My problem is I don't know how to tell if a firewall is any good with the defaults or what to tell it when it wants to know about a new something or other.

These tuneups seem useful and benign so far, unlike those of some other vendors I could name (spit, curse).

Yup. Let's keep our fingers crossed.

So, speaking of cursing and spitting, is there anything you can suggest that would enable me to get rid of Norton entirely? I'd like to be able to ditch no-good shortcuts and generally tidy up, including the registry. But it has to be a words of one syllable or less type program and safe and reversible.

fhaber
June 18th, 2005, 02:22 PM
C'mon, Molly. One syllable? For my guru on odd edibles, birds and fishy things? I don't think that Latin polysyllable that just floated out of your mouth is hiding you at all (g).

Seriously, Symantec itself has fairly good uninstall utils searchable by program and version on sarc.com. Some of the hints are good, too, if you want to clean your folder tree. Shortcuts can be trashed at any time. Just be careful in that registry over there. Most of what they leave behind is designed to capture your grandmother's genome, et. al., should you choose to reinstall.

PLEASE unistall NAV/NIS and Live Update/Reg in the normal way first, before you use any industrial strength solvents. Small leavings, if benign, are often much better than the effects of meddling.

NOTHING is entirely reversible in Windows. XP's restore points help a lot. In 98, well, bonne chance.

Oh, BTW, I have no experience with Grisoft's firewall/spam stuff, sorry.

Nick Parkin
June 19th, 2005, 12:53 AM
I really think you guys should throw Grisoft a bone. Fercryingoutloud, AVG7 Pro is only, what, $34 for **two years***? You get blindingly fast, troublefree update from an uncrowded server in return.

You are right, the free version is so much better than the competitive pay versions (he says having been called to rescue an infected PC "protected" by McAfee!)

Tip: manually update occasionally. If you see "recommended" and "optional" updates further down the box, choose the bottom one. You may have to reboot. These tuneups seem useful and benign so far, unlike those of some other vendors I could name (spit, curse).

I don't know if I'm missing something, but I've just told AVG what time of day it can do it's stuff without disturbing me & it gets on with life. I know I've been a bit illogical in that it updates it's virus definitions, & then checks the s/w update an hour AFTER, not sure how I managed that - but I don't think it's critical to change it.

Nick

Bill Hirst
June 19th, 2005, 12:37 PM
You are right, the free version is so much better than the competitive pay versions (he says having been called to rescue an infected PC "protected" by McAfee!)

I'll agree to that. It sits there quietly and does its job with no fuss. no update reminders, and no offers to buy more software. Occasionally it blocks a Trojan dropper, usually part of some game I'm downloading, so I know it's working.

Mike
June 20th, 2005, 01:58 AM
PLEASE unistall NAV/NIS and Live Update/Reg in the normal way first...
I did that. The NAV uninstall also removed some "shared" components, even though the non-NAV parts of some Symantec utilities were still installed. And it also reset some of my system options, without asking.

When the other computer needs to have its anti-virus changed, I will not be using NAV's uninstall. It has proven itself untrustworthy.

fhaber
June 20th, 2005, 09:04 AM
Yes, Symantec specializes in that sort of stuff. Retail-version uninstalls know not from Digital River (shudder) downloads, and NAV has only a dim awareness of NIS. Throw in Unclean Swoop, and you might as well reformat, sometimes.

Jeff
June 20th, 2005, 01:37 PM
I did that. The NAV uninstall also removed some "shared" components, even though the non-NAV parts of some Symantec utilities were still installed. And it also reset some of my system options, without asking.

When the other computer needs to have its anti-virus changed, I will not be using NAV's uninstall. It has proven itself untrustworthy.

When I went after the 'trial' NAV on HAL, via Add/Remove (not NAV uninstall), I also took out two or three other Symantec things. Immediately IE had no Javascript capability, and not much of anything to do about that as it's IBM java. Well there was a way, restore to factory shipment settings via format c:. Then I Add/Removed just NAV and all was well. I have no idea what that other Symantec stuff is, but it seems to have infested this machine to the point of non-removal.

MollyM/CA
June 20th, 2005, 06:34 PM
<Seriously, Symantec itself has fairly good uninstall utils searchable by program and version on sarc.com

?? All I saw were things to remove trojans --what I want to remove is as much of the Norton garbage as possible.

<Shortcuts can be trashed at any time.

What Norton prefers to do with them is re-route shortcuts it can't find files for (and I've often found the target files just where they were supposed to be). I've never allowed this to happen but I can just IMAGINE the mess it would make!!

<Just be careful in that registry over there. Most of what they leave behind is designed to capture your grandmother's genome, et. al., should you choose to reinstall.

What registry over where?

<PLEASE unistall NAV/NIS and Live Update/Reg in the normal way first, before you use any industrial strength solvents.

Now I'm half, no, just plain, scared to do that after reading all the horror stories here!

MollyM/CA
June 20th, 2005, 06:36 PM
So what WILL you use to uninstall as much of Norton as possible?

Mike
June 24th, 2005, 02:40 AM
I'll do it manually. First, I'll turn off the stuff that loads at boot and/or login time and run with that for a while to ensure I don't hit any problems. Then, I'll find the registry entries and delete them. When I'm convinced everything's copacetic, then I'll archive the files and delete them.

I still have the InCtrl5 report from when I installed NAV on that machine, so I have some clues about the registry settings that were done.