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davidh
March 17th, 2006, 09:56 AM
Corned beef and cabbage :
http://www.catholic.org/national/national_story.php?id=19043

"The “real stature of the man” is found in the fact that “Patrick was a migrant, not once but twice, to our land,” Archbishop Sean Brady of Armagh
http://www.catholic.org/international/international_story.php?id=19086

David H.

Judy G. Russell
March 17th, 2006, 01:58 PM
But ... but ... but I don't like corned beef and cabbage!

davidh
March 17th, 2006, 04:14 PM
But ... but ... but I don't like corned beef and cabbage! Well ... the parish youth group sponsored Friday lenten suppers offer a choice of baked or fried fish (with macaroni and cheese for those who don't want seafood). If that's too limited, you can go to your local seafood restaurant and have lobster with butter and then fast for the rest of the week to repair the hole in your wallet.

;)

David H.

P.S. After dinner you can carry the cross around to the fourteen stations while the deacon leads the recitation of the stations from St. Alphonsus Liguori (sorry not Irish) to "settle your dinner". Or if you still have a pile of dough left after the lobster, you could hop on a plane and do the Via Dolorosa in Jerusalem itself.

Judy G. Russell
March 17th, 2006, 04:29 PM
you can go to your local seafood restaurant and have lobster with butter
Now THERE'S an idea!

ndebord
March 17th, 2006, 06:15 PM
...Or if you still have a pile of dough left after the lobster, you could hop on a plane and do the Via Dolorosa in Jerusalem itself.

David,

The latter, please and if you could just lend me the price of a plane ticket, I promise to lift a glass of heavenly delight to your health just as soon as I reach the promised land!

;-)

davidh
March 17th, 2006, 07:06 PM
David,

The latter, please and if you could just lend me the price of a plane ticket, I promise to lift a glass of heavenly delight to your health just as soon as I reach the promised land!

;-) No problem. As soon as I win the lotto. As long as it's wine kosher l'pesach (I don't know what brands are in israel, but I rather like Manischevitz Blackberry) or sacramental wine properly blessed and administered by an ordained priest according to the rubrics of the magisterium. If you'd rather follow the buddhist or islamic traditions, then you're out of luck (except perhaps tibetan buddhism, not sure?), in which case you'd have to find some other form of nectar (maybe unfermented date juice? or milk and honey? yogurt with a little instant coffee is pretty good too).

D.H.

davidh
March 17th, 2006, 07:10 PM
No problem. As soon as I win the lotto. As long as it's wine kosher l'pesach (I don't know what brands are in israel, but I rather like Manischevitz Blackberry) or sacramental wine properly blessed and administered by an ordained priest according to the rubrics of the magisterium. If you'd rather follow the buddhist or islamic traditions, then you're out of luck (except perhaps tibetan buddhism, not sure?), in which case you'd have to find some other form of nectar (maybe unfermented date juice? or milk and honey? yogurt with a little instant coffee is pretty good too).

D.H. Oops, forgot, don't take lobster with kosher wine, it might explode in your tummy.

lensue
March 17th, 2006, 07:19 PM
>Oops, forgot, don't take lobster with kosher wine, it might explode in your tummy.<

David, you may need it for their chicken, however!

See NY Times
March 17, 2006
Israel Detects Cases of Avian Flu

http://tinyurl.com/kg3e3 Regards, Len

davidh
March 17th, 2006, 09:14 PM
But ... but ... but I don't like corned beef and cabbage! Talking about food. I'm getting an inspiration. How about pastrami on rye with cole slaw or kim-chee ? I don't know if Sullivan County is in the diocese of NY ... but you can get pretty good pastrami sandwiches in Monticello or Liberty on Route 17 in the Catskills. Or just go on Saturday or Sunday instead of Friday. (Ecumenical sandwiches ?)

And gobble some pancakes with maple syrup and butter while you're at it.

http://www.nysmaple.com/2006mwlist.html#sullivan

I only dared to buy cottage cheese at the supermarket today, if I had bought salami it might have not waited until tomorrow morning. Anyway, I didn't check to see if it was 100% beef or not.

David H.

P.S. It may be too early yet, and they are not edible (except for beavers) but budding blooming poplar trees smell heavenly when they're opening up in the spring. Locust tree flowers smell great too, but later in spring.

davidh
March 17th, 2006, 09:21 PM
>Oops, forgot, don't take lobster with kosher wine, it might explode in your tummy.<

David, you may need it for their chicken, however!

See NY Times
March 17, 2006
Israel Detects Cases of Avian Flu

http://tinyurl.com/kg3e3 Regards, Len Good point. I'll have to pick up a bottle of wine the next time I buy chicken. Port or sherry or marsala or vermouth just to make sure it's strong enough to neutralize the chicken.

Judy G. Russell
March 17th, 2006, 11:42 PM
It may be too early yet, and they are not edible (except for beavers) but budding blooming poplar trees smell heavenly when they're opening up in the spring. Locust tree flowers smell great too, but later in spring.We're supposed to have a half-dozen or so nights of freezing temps here so too early, it is, for sure.

ndebord
March 17th, 2006, 11:49 PM
Oops, forgot, don't take lobster with kosher wine, it might explode in your tummy.


David,

ROF,L!

Ah yes, the kosher revenge. A secret poison in kosher wine that kills you when you drink it while eating shellfish!

davidh
March 18th, 2006, 11:01 AM
David,

ROF,L!

Ah yes, the kosher revenge. A secret poison in kosher wine that kills you when you drink it while eating shellfish! My wife returns from her stay in Cali (not South America, but Santa Ana) today. We'll probably have to go to the local oriental grocery to buy some Thailand rice and fish sauce today. Reminds me, maybe fortified rice wine would be a good substitute to go with shellfish? Apparently Oriental groceries in FLA don't even need to get a liquor license or do alcohol tax collection to sell it. It's probably considered food or medicine or both. Better than untaxed spanish cooking wine because it has no salt in it. You can cook with it, apply it like rubbing alcochol, or drink a toast. But I suspect that the alcohol content is too low to make a flambe [sp?]. Anyway according to my wife's oriental cooking kashrus it's probably more kosher than blackberry wine, she's the halachic authority in this house. OTOH sweet vermouth might also be a good alternative. Her cousin (also Vietnamese of course) had never had any before we brought a bottle over to his house one evening, and he said it tasted like oriental medicine. Often the orientals take the medicine from the oriental herbalists and put the herb mixture in a bottle of brandy, rum, or whiskey to "brew" and then decoct the liquid to administer the doses. So one is sure to get a benefit one way or another. Scuppernong wine is a real 100% american wine that also has a slightly medicinal taste, but I haven't been able to find it in stores for years (a casualty of the New World Order?). I wonder if retsina is considered to have any medicinal value beyond regular wine, you could stop over in Athens on the way to Jerusalem and have a bottle or two.

BTW IIRC I believe Reb Fernando is an expert in both Jewish and non-Jewish gourmet food. Perhaps somebody still has a photo of one of the shots he took of Spanish or Thai food :)

David H.

davidh
March 18th, 2006, 12:14 PM
Speaking of medicinal value....

Which is the best medicine laughter or music?

For the mature stomach with respect to "wine, women, and song", it would seem that song is more easily digested. Offhand, I'd pick Alvin and the Chipmunks. Unfortunately I only know of their Christmas songs. Don't know if Alvin ever did any Passover or Easter songs? Probably Alvin would try to sneak in some nuts fried in bacon fat on a Friday. Though nuts fried in cocoa butter or dipped in chocolate would probably be both kosher and ok on Fridays.

David H.

P.S. Maybe I should go soak myself in salt water at the beach to get food off the mind.

Judy G. Russell
March 18th, 2006, 03:26 PM
If you pick Alvin and the Chipmunks, you'd have music AND laughter.

And while the original Alvin only did Christmas songs AFAIK, there is some new stuff (http://www.thechipmunks.com/catalog/index.php)...

Bill Hirst
March 18th, 2006, 04:56 PM
New Chipmunks songs? I'm going to put that on my Santa list this year.

davidh
March 18th, 2006, 05:16 PM
If you pick Alvin and the Chipmunks, you'd have music AND laughter.

And while the original Alvin only did Christmas songs AFAIK, there is some new stuff (http://www.thechipmunks.com/catalog/index.php)... That's the idea. Thanks for the pointer. Maybe the next CD will be Alvin sings the Congressional Record in Latin ?

ndebord
March 18th, 2006, 07:03 PM
David,

Thai Rice is nice, but Indian is better. Or perhaps I should amend that to say that American growers off the Mississippi have taken Basmanti Rice to a new level. Their brown basmanti rice is to die for imo. <g>

The fish sauce, OTOH, is divine. We use lots of Asian sauces here, but then with our access to NYC markets, we seldom are at a loss for ingredients. I love to cook and my wife is better than I, so food is a big thing in our household.

BA-MA-BA, or Vietnamese 33 beer, otherwise known as "Tiger Piss" was the drink of record for the Vietnamese War. Could have wished for Normandy instead and good old jug Burgundy, like the French relatives on my father's side of the family tree. But the idea that various alcohol products pass munster with the local alcohol board officials does not surprise me at all. Chinatowns of all ilks have their own ways and government officials are wise to ignore most everything that goes on there. <g>

My wife likes to cook French (and being half French I heartily approve!). And since she is a better cook than I, I don't argue one little bit. Ironically, most of the Chinese-style cooking in the house is of my doing, as I do a mean stir-fry. We often visit Elizabeth Street to get concoctions for various ailments. So I guess you could say we are accustomed to a mix of western and eastern medical practices to heal our various ailments from time to time.

Once upon a time, I had a German Jewish girlfriend and ate lots of kosher food. Never cottoned to it though. I like my heritage and my wife's. China and France have great climates for growing food stuff and it shows in the cuisine!

Judy G. Russell
March 18th, 2006, 10:53 PM
Private message me with your snail mail address. Santa just may come early this year... not that I have a connection or anything, but.......

Judy G. Russell
March 18th, 2006, 10:54 PM
Maybe the next CD will be Alvin sings the Congressional Record in Latin ?AIEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!