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Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 12:04 PM
Okay... I put in a-l-l-l-l-l-l-l-l those hours last fall planting daffodils and tulips so I'd have color in my yard in April and May. So what happens? We get a whole spate of unseasonably warm weather in January. Now, in early February, I have (a) a bunch of leaves poking their heads up through the soil and (b) at least six more weeks of seasonably cold weather likely.

Is there anything I can do to protect these things???

Mike Landi
February 8th, 2006, 01:23 PM
Okay... I put in a-l-l-l-l-l-l-l-l those hours last fall planting daffodils and tulips so I'd have color in my yard in April and May. So what happens? We get a whole spate of unseasonably warm weather in January. Now, in early February, I have (a) a bunch of leaves poking their heads up through the soil and (b) at least six more weeks of seasonably cold weather likely.

Is there anything I can do to protect these things???

If they are less than about two inches high, don't worry. My daffofils, hyacinth and tulips do that every year. I have a bunch against the side of the house, and even if it is 0 degrees, by February the sun heats up the side of the house and melts the snow next to the house. The bulbs pop up, grow a little and stop. In March, they start up again. (I have a ton of bulbs up now, about an inch or so.)

If you are really worried, cover them with leaves if you have any left from fall, but that is probably not necessary.

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 01:40 PM
I'd say on average the ones that are up are up between two and three inches. I do still have some leaves so I'll spread those around. And then cross my fingers. If I did all that work last fall only to have Mother Nature thumb her nose at me with this warm weather, I will be soooooooooooo annoyed.

Mike Landi
February 8th, 2006, 01:45 PM
I'd say on average the ones that are up are up between two and three inches. I do still have some leaves so I'll spread those around. And then cross my fingers. If I did all that work last fall only to have Mother Nature thumb her nose at me with this warm weather, I will be soooooooooooo annoyed.

I'll bet you have no problems at all. Those bulbs are quite hardy.

If this is their first Spring, don't be alarmed if you don't get many flowers, especially the tulips. That's just a transplant side-effect. One thing you probably know is you do not cut the greens after the flowers are done. That will kill them!

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 02:03 PM
I'll bet you have no problems at all. Those bulbs are quite hardy.That's good to know.

If this is their first Spring, don't be alarmed if you don't get many flowers, especially the tulips. That's just a transplant side-effect. Hmmm... I didn't know that! I'll try not to have too much of a temper tantrum if I don't get as many flowers as I expected. I just am not much for digging around in the dirt... and want a LOT of return for the work I did! I am encouraged by the fact that these things are growing at all but I sure wish the weather wasn't so weird...

One thing you probably know is you do not cut the greens after the flowers are done. That will kill them!I do know that, but the reminder is helpful, thanks. I will also remind the guy who does my yard. I tried to make sure all the planting was in areas where it wouldn't be TOO likely that the mower would be used, but...

Mike Landi
February 8th, 2006, 03:28 PM
I just am not much for digging around in the

...especailly if there are some nice eight-legged critters about! <gd&r>

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 04:35 PM
"Nice" is not a word I would use with "eight-legged critters" -- but the only reason I wanted that particular eight-legged critter assassinated was that it was HUGE! (Spiders generally don't scare me. BIG spiders, otoh...)

rlohmann
February 8th, 2006, 05:58 PM
You don't have to do anything. When the cold hits, they simply shut down and wait for the weather to change.

The plants have been at this longer than you have. In fact, they've been at it even longer than I have. In fact, they've been at it even longer than Wayne has, which is a very long time indeed.

Mike Landi
February 8th, 2006, 09:04 PM
Ones big enough to steal the chocolate?

Lindsey
February 8th, 2006, 09:19 PM
Is there anything I can do to protect these things???
They don't need protecting; I read somewhere that plants like that have their own built-in anti-freeze. And daffodils always start poking up out of the ground in late winter. That's what's really cheery about spring bulbs -- they start showing the promise of spring even while there's still snow on the ground. The main thing you'd need to worry about is if, once they got tall and started to bloom, there was a late snow which could bend them down and break the stalks.

Check this: http://exviking.net/springtime/small/snow.htm

--Lindsey

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 09:25 PM
Exactly! I mean, what else could I worry about???

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 09:27 PM
I understand what you mean, but though plants in general have been at this longer than I have, these plants in particular just got planted through a lot of hard work last fall! So I worry...

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 09:27 PM
Wow! That's impressive. Okay. I'll stop worrying. Mostly.

Karl Semper
February 8th, 2006, 10:10 PM
I have some trantulas that you can have. My wife really loves it when she finds them in the pool strainer. :-)

Judy G. Russell
February 8th, 2006, 10:23 PM
Errrrr... no thanks. I really appreciate the offer though.

(Ewwwwwww.....)