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Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 08:18 AM
One sister, one brother-in-law, one brother, five nieces and nephews, one niece's fiancee (their commitment ceremony is in January), one nephew's roommate (his parents are in Moscow) -- wow! and whew! what a holiday! I have a ton of things to catch up on and none of the usual weekend chores have even been started yet, but BOY did I have fun. The youngest of this crowd is now 15, so they are all challenging and witty and interesting and... sigh... the bottom line was that it was a non-stop party from the time the first of them arrived (I can't say "until the last of them left" -- I still have one nephew asleep in the back room).

So... how was YOUR Thanksgiving?

Peter Creasey
November 27th, 2005, 09:05 AM
Judy, An off year for me with respect to Thanksgiving. Even so, I had a fantastic bowl of black bean soup.

lensue
November 27th, 2005, 10:03 AM
>So... how was YOUR Thanksgiving?<

Judy, ours was wonderful. Every Thanksgiving we go to our friend's house in Brooklyn--there were 19 of us this year and I was completely gluttonous! Fortunately the weather wasn't as bad as they had predicted earlier in the week. Last night friends were in from Orlando where they had retired and about 14 of us celebrated at the Newark IronBound's Spanish Sangria--there was a lot of eating and I brought home a portion of mariscada which I froze. Regards, Len

Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 11:22 AM
Hmmm... black bean soup for Thanksgiving... a new American tradition?

Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 11:23 AM
We always end our Thanksgiving celebrations on the Saturday after with a Broadway show (this year Avenue Q and oh BOY is that funny) and then dinner at Ruth's Chris. I'm still full.

RayB (France)
November 27th, 2005, 02:41 PM
**So... how was YOUR Thanksgiving?**

Just the two of us with full traditional dinner. Teresa picked a pumpkin from our garden Weds morn and made the pie. Can't get any fresher than that.

The other was the view from my desk Fri. morn that happened overnight.

BTW - The Broncs said 'You're welcome' even though we had to go into OT to help.

davidh
November 27th, 2005, 03:38 PM
Hmmm... black bean soup for Thanksgiving... a new American tradition?
turkey cabbage and tomato soup here

lensue
November 27th, 2005, 07:16 PM
>dinner at Ruth's Chris<

Judy, you had steak--which cut? Regards, Len [salivating]

lensue
November 27th, 2005, 07:22 PM
>The other was the view from my desk Fri. morn <

Ray, great shots! BTW speaking of your stuff, were you in Detroit when Hank Greenberg played for the Tigers--a few days ago I watched a fascinating documentary on this guy. The film stated the following among other things: "Greenberg toiled in the hometown of two of America's greatest homegrown anti-Semites, Father Charles Coughlin and Henry Ford. Everywhere Greenberg went, the stands and the rival dugouts were filled with crackers. Until Jackie Robinson came along, surely no major leaguer endured so much abuse and did so with as much courage, dignity and distinction." Regards, Len

ktinkel
November 27th, 2005, 08:02 PM
So... how was YOUR Thanksgiving?I had the first turkey catastrophe since I was 20-something and just learning how to cook! But we had a good time anyway. (Fortunately it was just Jack and me and I do believe he could survive on stuffing all by itself!)

It did not snow. Nothing bad happened. A neighbor brought over some wonderful pieces of pie. It was, all in all, a very nice (if irritating) day.

Dan in Saint Louis
November 27th, 2005, 08:20 PM
My parents (86 and 84) drove in from Illinois for dinner -- well, we call it that but it is served about 1 PM so we can rest up for dessert and still get them back home before dark.

Unfortunately I got some kind of flu, bad stomach cramps about 6 PM and have not been enjoying any leftovers since. Hope to be able to start eating again tomorrow!

Mike
November 27th, 2005, 08:44 PM
We had a mixed time at our end. Brent had to work a little bit that morning, and then we headed to Sacramento to do a little work on our rental unit before the tenants move in next week. Unfortunately, we'd started a little later than we'd intended, and about the time we got half-way there, the traffic was so backed up that we had to bail or not make it to our friends' for dinner.

We arrived at the friends' house in sufficient time to have cocktails on the patio, and collected four bags of Myers lemons from the tree that was so overloaded the limbs were dangerously close to the ground.

Our hosts made a wonderful dinner, and we contributed the dessert--a pumpkin cheesecake. We spent the night there, so we didn't have to drive home (but I had to put Brent on BART early in the morning to return to work. I spent the day packing stuff at my place in preparation for the move.

Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 08:47 PM
turkey cabbage and tomato soup hereLordy, I hope there's a comma missing there somewhere...

Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 08:48 PM
I'm a filet mignon type myself. Medium rare, or course.

Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 08:51 PM
Just the two of us with full traditional dinner. Teresa picked a pumpkin from our garden Weds morn and made the pie. Can't get any fresher than that. Mmmmmm... homemade pie... we "only" had two French silk, one apple, one cherry, one pumpkin and (droooool) two pecan pies...

The other was the view from my desk Fri. morn that happened overnight.EEK!!! COLD WHITE STUFF!!! (I hate winter.)

BTW - The Broncs said 'You're welcome' even though we had to go into OT to help.And we do appreciate it, despite our performance today. (It was actually a spectacular game, which the kicker lost for us by missing -- count 'em -- three field goal attempts...)

Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 08:53 PM
I had the first turkey catastrophe since I was 20-something and just learning how to cook! But we had a good time anyway. (Fortunately it was just Jack and me and I do believe he could survive on stuffing all by itself!)Uh oh... do I want to ask what happened or shall we just forget the whole thing?

It did not snow. Nothing bad happened. A neighbor brought over some wonderful pieces of pie. It was, all in all, a very nice (if irritating) day.Mmmm... what kind of pie?

Judy G. Russell
November 27th, 2005, 08:54 PM
The one thing I have learned is you never ever ever try to drive anywhere on Thanksgiving Day without leaving at least an hour more than you imagine it could possibly take. (And my family wonders why I have T'Day dinner at my house? I don't have to drive anywhere!)

Mike
November 28th, 2005, 01:03 AM
We thought we were ahead of the traffic, but apparently not.

Brent and I made the trip today (it's still Sunday for me as I type this). We had to go because the dryer vent was disconnected somewhere within the walls of the unit. Fortunately, we had a place we could open the wall without leaving an obvious hole, and sure enough, the two pieces of vent pipe were about six inches apart, laterally (so we could simply align them and tape them). We found about ten years' worth of lint in the space underneath the stairs!

But the good part of the trip is that we collected the first rent payment from our tenants!

Peter Creasey
November 28th, 2005, 08:49 AM
black bean soup for Thanksgiving... a new American tradition?

Judy, Hopefully just an "off" year. Things got discombobulated this year.

Judy G. Russell
November 28th, 2005, 09:06 AM
Hopefully just an "off" year. Things got discombobulated this year.I've had years like that... hope next year is better.

ktinkel
November 28th, 2005, 10:14 AM
Unfortunately I got some kind of flu, bad stomach cramps about 6 PM and have not been enjoying any leftovers since.Oh, no! Hope you are better now.

Next time get sick on a fasting day, not Thanksgiving! Much more efficient.

ktinkel
November 28th, 2005, 10:21 AM
Uh oh... do I want to ask what happened or shall we just forget the whole thing?

Mmmm... what kind of pie?I tried the high-heat method, which probably would have worked fine (I use it all the time for chicken), but I decided to hedge my bets with the turkey and made an aluminum foil shield for the breast, which I either should not have done at all or for a much shorter period. Bottom line: Overcooked legs (of all things!), rare-ish thighs, and slightly rarer than safe breast. We just picked around the edges.

Besides, I had a dental implant on Wednesday, of the “immediate-load” type, and cannot bite even a marshmallow for three weeks. I have to cut up everything into one-bite units. (That is how I made my turkey sandwich the day after!)

Pies: She brought us two slices each of pumpkin and pecan. The pumpkin was excellent. The pecan was probably the first time I really liked that pie — lots of really good pecans and the gooey part not sickeningly sweet. Really great pies. We enjoyed them.

All in all, not really such a bad day. I won a free turkey at the market (have to pick it up before Dec. 31), so maybe I will experiment again on that high-heat method. Where it worked, the skin was gorgeous (sort of like Peking duck!), the meat succulent and tender. Next time I won’t mess around, though.

Peter Creasey
November 28th, 2005, 04:05 PM
I tried the high-heat method, which probably would have worked fine (I use it all the time for chicken), but I decided to hedge my bets with the turkey and made an aluminum foil shield for the breast

K, If you ever cook your turkey breast down (for most of the time), you'll likely not ever cook it any other way thereafter. The juices are in the back so breast down allows the juices to permeate through the bird.

Judy G. Russell
November 28th, 2005, 05:38 PM
I tried the high-heat methodI don't think I know exactly what that is.

Besides, I had a dental implant on Wednesday, of the “immediate-load” type, and cannot bite even a marshmallow for three weeks. I have to cut up everything into one-bite units. (That is how I made my turkey sandwich the day after!)OUCH!!! Okay, then, it probably wouldn't have mattered all that much anyway... But I still wanna know what the high heat method is!

Judy G. Russell
November 28th, 2005, 05:39 PM
We found about ten years' worth of lint in the space underneath the stairs!Uh oh... that's an invitation to a fire. Good thing you found it and got it cleaned out.

But the good part of the trip is that we collected the first rent payment from our tenants!Ahh! A major league silver lining to that traffic cloud!

ktinkel
November 28th, 2005, 07:11 PM
K, If you ever cook your turkey breast down (for most of the time), you'll likely not ever cook it any other way thereafter. The juices are in the back so breast down allows the juices to permeate through the bird.Sorry — not so. I have tried every method on earth to cook turkey: breast down; breast down then up; breast down, to left, to right, then up; turkey butterflied; turkey cut in pieces; turkey stuffed, turkey unstuffed.

I do believe this high heat method should work. But either trust in it or not — do not do (as I did) hedge your bet by shielding part of the bird for a crucial part of the time!

I cook chickens at 450°F all the time, and they are sublime.

ktinkel
November 28th, 2005, 07:16 PM
But I still wanna know what the high heat method is!Turn the oven to 450°F. Salt the outside and inside of the bird, and place it, breast up, on a shallow rack (a V-rack doesn’t work very well) in a roasting pan, and place it in the oven.

Roast for about one-and-a quarter hours, and check the temp in crucial parts; if necessary, roast longer, until the thermometer reports 165°F all around.

Take it out. That’s it. That is how I usually cook chickens (for a shorter time), and they are sublime. I think it will work for turkey, but I need to have faith and not screw around with foil shields!

Since I now get a “free” turkey from ShopRite, I get another chance to try. As soon as I can bite again.

Judy G. Russell
November 28th, 2005, 07:18 PM
Turn the oven to 450°F.Hmmm... I wonder if that's going to work as well with a turkey, since it's a generally bigger bird. I suspect you're always going to end up with wings and legs a bit overdone. But (droooool I love turkey) I'll be waiting to hear how you make out!

ndebord
November 28th, 2005, 08:53 PM
Judy,

It was good that you had so much of your family together. I had my immediate, my wife, my brother-in-law and wife and their two kids and one family friend. Of my 7 nieces and nephews, etc., 2 are in Iraq right now, but are well and the rest...all those fundamentalists in my family tree are in Texas with 2 exceptions still in Michigan. I expect, in time to see all of them move there eventually.

As for food. We had a very traditional meal. An 18 lb turkey, cooked to perfection, 3 kinds of stuffing, traditional, cornbread and shrimp and lots of normal sides, like sweet potatoes, cranberries and a little stirfry with mixed vegs. The pie was lemon and very good and the wine a Pinot Noir from California. All in all, a very good time was had by all.

ktinkel
November 28th, 2005, 08:56 PM
Hmmm... I wonder if that's going to work as well with a turkey, since it's a generally bigger bird. I suspect you're always going to end up with wings and legs a bit overdone. But (droooool I love turkey) I'll be waiting to hear how you make out!I will let you know.

I will say that both the New York Times food section a couple of weeks ago and the November Gourmet magazine both encouraged me! But we shall see.

Judy G. Russell
November 28th, 2005, 11:00 PM
I will say that both the New York Times food section a couple of weeks ago and the November Gourmet magazine both encouraged me! But we shall see.I can't read magazines or newspaper sections like that. I drool all over them...

Judy G. Russell
November 28th, 2005, 11:06 PM
It was good that you had so much of your family together.Are you kidding? That barely scratches the surface. The missing included oldest brother and wife and two kids are in Chicago. Older sister in Virginia. Brother just younger with wife and three kids in Arizona (his oldest was here with me). Brother and wife and two stepsons in Colorado. Niece, nephew-in-law and grandniece in Kentucky. Youngest brother, wife and two boys in Chicago to visit her Dad. If we ever tried to get everybody together, the National Guard would get called out, and that's just the immediate family. Keep in mind my mother was one of 12 kids -- I have something on the order of 40 first cousins! Plus eight of my aunts and uncles are still alive.

As for food. We had a very traditional meal. An 18 lb turkey, cooked to perfection, 3 kinds of stuffing, traditional, cornbread and shrimp and lots of normal sides, like sweet potatoes, cranberries and a little stirfry with mixed vegs. The pie was lemon and very good and the wine a Pinot Noir from California. All in all, a very good time was had by all.I really do love Thanksgiving. It's such a good holiday and a great excuse for total gluttony. I hate the way Christmas is crowding it out these days. I drove home tonight and about 10% of the houses already have their decorations up. BLEAH. BAH HUMBUG!

Mike
November 29th, 2005, 12:07 AM
Ahh! A major league silver lining to that traffic cloud!
Indeed.

And today, I got a raise at work. 6.25%!!!

RayB (France)
November 29th, 2005, 07:57 AM
Ray, great shots! BTW speaking of your stuff, were you in Detroit when Hank Greenberg played for the Tigers

Sure was, Len, he was one of my heroes. We moved out of the city every summer to a lake about 25 miles from Detroit and we would rent our house to one of the Tigers for the season. Mostly to George Kell. Tough stuff for a young guy! I still have a ball autographed by the whole team. It was after Hank's time though.

lensue
November 29th, 2005, 08:24 AM
>Sure was, Len, he was one of my heroes<

Ray, well the film was quite interesting with great footage and I can see why the big guy was a hero. Here are just 4 of the many vignettes from the film:

1. "Hammerin' Hank" was an imposing figure, 6-feet-4-inches tall. But he was not too big to lay down a sacrifice bunt, to retool himself in mid-career as an outfielder for the sake of his team, to stand in front of the mirror in a Jewish dress designer's shop for hours checking his swing or to take batting practice until his hands were bloodied with blisters. He was the type of selfless player -- nearly as extinct today as the complete game -- to cherish runs batted in far more than showboat stats like home runs or batting averages.


2. But on Yom Kippur that year, Greenberg did not play at all... Edgar Guest, the poet laureate of Detroit, praised Greenberg in print.

We shall miss him in the infield
And shall miss him at the bat
But he's true to his religion
And I honor him for that!

Incidentally, the Tigers lost that day.

3. To Detroiters, Greenberg's grand slam on the last day of the 1945 season, which won another pennant for the Tigers, was every bit as magical and certainly freighted with far more historic significance. It came not only after Greenberg had returned to the lineup after four years in the Army, but as American Jews were learning of the full dimensions of the catastrophe that had just befallen their uncles, aunts and cousins in Europe.

4. But before the 1947 season, in a fit of pique by Tigers owner Walter Briggs, he was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Pirates allayed Greenberg's ire by moving in the left field fence for him (dubbing the new area in Forbes Field "Greenberg's Gardens") and making him baseball's first $100,000 player. For his fans in Detroit, though, there was no such solace. "It was like your bubbe moved to Mississippi," one of them laments." Regards, Len

Judy G. Russell
November 29th, 2005, 09:32 AM
today, I got a raise at work. 6.25%!!!WOW! That's fantastic! Most raises around here are 2-3%, if that. Nice to know you're appreciated!

ndebord
November 29th, 2005, 10:11 AM
Are you kidding? That barely scratches the surface. The missing included oldest brother and wife and two kids are in Chicago. Older sister in Virginia. Brother just younger with wife and three kids in Arizona (his oldest was here with me). Brother and wife and two stepsons in Colorado. Niece, nephew-in-law and grandniece in Kentucky. Youngest brother, wife and two boys in Chicago to visit her Dad. If we ever tried to get everybody together, the National Guard would get called out, and that's just the immediate family. Keep in mind my mother was one of 12 kids -- I have something on the order of 40 first cousins! Plus eight of my aunts and uncles are still alive.

I really do love Thanksgiving. It's such a good holiday and a great excuse for total gluttony. I hate the way Christmas is crowding it out these days. I drove home tonight and about 10% of the houses already have their decorations up. BLEAH. BAH HUMBUG!


Judy,

I keep forgetting that you have an even larger family than I. <g> Most everybody in my family was in Palestine, TX (yes there's a joke in there somewhere, considering the Middle East bent of my younger relatives).
Thirteen (for now) grand nephews and nieces and all the old folks traveled there I hear (except us). I too think Thanksgiving is the best holiday around and FWIW, lots of Xmas decorations up all around me. I generally wait until the second week in December and by then am the last to do up the joint. <sigh>

ndebord
November 29th, 2005, 10:16 AM
Sure was, Len, he was one of my heroes. We moved out of the city every summer to a lake about 25 miles from Detroit and we would rent our house to one of the Tigers for the season. Mostly to George Kell. Tough stuff for a young guy! I still have a ball autographed by the whole team. It was after Hank's time though.

Ray,

Different times, but I used to watch the Tigers religiously. My years were Al Kaline, Norm Cash, Frank Lary, etc. Had a cousin who pitched for them for a bit (Dave Wickersham). Good control pitcher and had a decent cureball. Moved around a lot from team to team.

Now, of course, I'm a Yankee fan. <g>

lensue
November 29th, 2005, 10:31 AM
>Now, of course, I'm a Yankee fan<

N, I've always been a Yankee fan and guys like Kaline and Cash drove me crazy! BTW I think you're name is Nick, right? I tried to look it up by clicking on the members list but for seem reason I couldn't get access to the list--I was hoping to look up your first name. Regards, Len

MollyM/CA
November 29th, 2005, 12:31 PM
About the same head count and composition as yours, Judy. Our real Thanksgiving is the Family Fall Feast and Fun Fest my sister organises -- "Family" being anyone who's invited and all available blood relatives but one, and all the dogs and a few kitties and the Psychotic Psittacoid. The pictures: Me showing my sister Reni what the dry hominy looks like --the cooked is in the white dish--; a segment of the floating poker game (hey, how many spots does the eight have?) --can you tell who's the Marine? and, to celebrate that for the first time in three years I was able to walk to the lake, a picture of the lake at Camp Latieze where it all happens, up on the slopes of Mt. Lassen. If you could look to the right you might see it, if some trees fell down.

You do Broadway, we end the weekend by cutting a Christmas tree.

m

ktinkel
November 29th, 2005, 02:24 PM
today, I got a raise at work. 6.25%!!!Yow! They really, really appreciate you. Congratulations!

Judy G. Russell
November 29th, 2005, 03:36 PM
I keep forgetting that you have an even larger family than I. <g> Most everybody in my family was in Palestine, TX (yes there's a joke in there somewhere, considering the Middle East bent of my younger relatives).
Thirteen (for now) grand nephews and nieces and all the old folks traveled there I hear (except us).There are lots of Texas city names that are jokes (Paris TX?). And then there's Dish TX (did you hear about that? an entire "city" -- population about 100 -- changed its name in return for free Dish satellite programming...).

I too think Thanksgiving is the best holiday around and FWIW, lots of Xmas decorations up all around me. I generally wait until the second week in December and by then am the last to do up the joint. <sigh>Every year I say to myself, right around the first of the year, this year I'm going to put up some very tasteful Christmas decorations. I think about it again when it's too late to do it...

Judy G. Russell
November 29th, 2005, 03:38 PM
Gorgeous pictures (and yes, as the sister of a recently retired Marine I can spot that haircut a mile off) -- what a beautiful area...

davidh
November 29th, 2005, 03:55 PM
that for the first time in three years I was able to walk to the lake Good to hear that your treads are getting some mileage ;)

David H.

Lindsey
November 29th, 2005, 08:27 PM
Hmmm... I wonder if that's going to work as well with a turkey, since it's a generally bigger bird. I suspect you're always going to end up with wings and legs a bit overdone. But (droooool I love turkey) I'll be waiting to hear how you make out!
The suggestion of the "America's Test Kitchen" folks for solving that problem: butterfly the turkey (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4187072). (Discussion of the high temperature method of cooking a turkey begins at about 3:50 into the segment; the butterflying suggestion comes a bit later.)

--Lindsey

Lindsey
November 29th, 2005, 08:37 PM
I really do love Thanksgiving. It's such a good holiday and a great excuse for total gluttony. I hate the way Christmas is crowding it out these days. I drove home tonight and about 10% of the houses already have their decorations up. BLEAH. BAH HUMBUG!
You know, I hadn't really thought about that, but you're right. Thanksgiving is a uniquely American holiday, and one that is independent of any creed, and we really ought to give ourselves more time to enjoy it. Unfortunately, the pressures of the marketplace won't allow it. :( I hate that there is virtually no aspect of our lives any more that hasn't been invaded by commerce. Some people are even selling space on their bodies for tatooed advertising, for cryin' out loud. And there was a feature on the radio just recently about a town named "Santa" (I forget in which state) that is being offered a bunch of money to change its name to "SecretSanta.com". Pfffffffft!!!

--Lindsey

Lindsey
November 29th, 2005, 08:38 PM
And today, I got a raise at work. 6.25%!!!
Yay!!! Congratulations!!!

--Lindsey

Lindsey
November 29th, 2005, 08:41 PM
And then there's Dish TX (did you hear about that? an entire "city" -- population about 100 -- changed its name in return for free Dish satellite programming...).
Aaaaak! What was I just saying?

--Lindsey

Judy G. Russell
November 29th, 2005, 08:47 PM
I hate that there is virtually no aspect of our lives any more that hasn't been invaded by commerce.Ain't that the truth...

Judy G. Russell
November 29th, 2005, 08:47 PM
Aaaaak! What was I just saying?Scary, isn't it????

ndebord
November 29th, 2005, 08:48 PM
Aaaaak! What was I just saying?

--Lindsey

Lindsey,

Ah Hell (MI)...It couldn't beat reality!

<g>

davidh
November 29th, 2005, 08:58 PM
* Podunk, CT, New Haven, US
* Podunk, MI, Barry, US
* Podunk, MI, Gladwin, US
* Podunk, NY, Tompkins, US
* Podunk, VT, Windham, US

Found in mapquest. Just to verify that it's not a mythical place.

David H.

Lindsey
November 29th, 2005, 09:52 PM
Ah Hell (MI)...It couldn't beat reality!
LOL!!

--Lindsey

Judy G. Russell
November 29th, 2005, 10:58 PM
Well, there isn't exactly a Nowhere:

* Nowhere Branch, GA, US
* Nowhere Branch, NC, US
* Nowhere Branch, TN, US
* Nowhere Creek, AK, US
* Nowhere Creek, ID, US

But I think I'd rather live in Moonshine, IL.

Mike
November 30th, 2005, 01:23 AM
Thanks to all (Judy, Kathleen, and Lindsey)!