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View Full Version : [Dixonary] Round 2685: Vote Here for PINGLE


Dodi Schultz
February 18th, 2016, 12:49 PM
The 18 definitions of PINGLE below all claim to come from a dictionary, but only one of them actually did. Can you find it? Cast your votes for the two you think most likely. Do so publicly, by reply to this message.

One exception: If you now recognize the real def, you must recuse yourself: Don't reply publicly. Do e-mail me and let me know.

The deadline for casting your votes:
 
Saturday 20 February, 9 a.m. EST, which is:
6 a.m. PST
8 a.m. CST
2 p.m. GMT
3 p.m. CET
Sunday 21 February:
1 a.m. AEST
3 a.m. NZST

—Dodi


 1. [Archaic] pink.

 2. a fingernail or toenail extension.

 3. to act ineptly or inefficiently; bungle.

 4. a children's game, similar to hopscotch.

 5. a bell used to give warning of approach in bear country.

 6. a primitive wooden game with pegs and a board with holes.

 7. [Chiefly Scottish] to dawdle or trifle, especially with one's food.

 8. a frying-pan used to cook bannocks (Sc) and biscuits (USA) over an open fire.

 9. a solid metal or wooden device used on traditionally rigged sailing vessels to secure lines of running rigging. Also called a "belaying pin."

10. formerly, a piece of cloth serving as a saddle; hence, a soft pad beneath a saddletree to prevent chafing.

11. a juvenile penguin, esp. Eudyptula minor (little penguin or fairy penguin).

12. a wild watermelon, Citrullus lanatus, native to N. America.

13. [Obs. or dial.] a snowflake; a snowdrop (Galanthus spp.).

14. to move quickly with sudden turns and shifts.

15. to fold, crease, or crush with the fingers.

16. a large marble used for dropping shots.

17. a small tile used in a mosaic.

18. to micturate.






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Tim B
February 18th, 2016, 01:40 PM
2 and 9, please.

Best wishes,
Tim Bourne.

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Judy Madnick
February 18th, 2016, 02:13 PM
Although I think they're wrong, I'll vote for the games: 4 and 6.

Judy Madnick
Albany, NY

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Tim Lodge
February 18th, 2016, 02:22 PM
I'll act ineptly by picking a penguin, 3 and 11, please.

3. to act ineptly or inefficiently; bungle.

11. a juvenile penguin, esp. *Eudyptula minor* (little penguin or fairy
penguin).

-- Tim L

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France International/Mike Shefler
February 18th, 2016, 02:51 PM
I'll go for 8 and 12.

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endash@verizon.net
February 18th, 2016, 04:28 PM
Not a clue, so I'll take 7 and 9 just to be on the safe side.

Dick Weltz
 




 



 





On 02/18/16, Dodi Schultz<DodiSchultz (AT) verizon (DOT) net> wrote:

 



The 18 definitions of PINGLE below all claim to come from a dictionary, but only one of them actually did. Can you find it? Cast your votes for the two you think most likely. Do so publicly, by reply to this message.

One exception: If you now recognize the real def, you must recuse yourself: Don't reply publicly. Do e-mail me and let me know.

The deadline for casting your votes:
 
Saturday 20 February, 9 a.m. EST, which is:
6 a.m. PST
8 a.m. CST
2 p.m. GMT
3 p.m. CET
Sunday 21 February:
1 a.m. AEST
3 a.m. NZST

—Dodi


 1. [Archaic] pink.

 2. a fingernail or toenail extension.

 3. to act ineptly or inefficiently; bungle.

 4. a children's game, similar to hopscotch.

 5. a bell used to give warning of approach in bear country.

 6. a primitive wooden game with pegs and a board with holes.

 7. [Chiefly Scottish] to dawdle or trifle, especially with one's food.

 8. a frying-pan used to cook bannocks (Sc) and biscuits (USA) over an open fire.

 9. a solid metal or wooden device used on traditionally rigged sailing vessels to secure lines of running rigging. Also called a "belaying pin."

10. formerly, a piece of cloth serving as a saddle; hence, a soft pad beneath a saddletree to prevent chafing.

11. a juvenile penguin, esp. Eudyptula minor (little penguin or fairy penguin).

12. a wild watermelon, Citrullus lanatus, native to N. America.

13. [Obs. or dial.] a snowflake; a snowdrop (Galanthus spp.).

14. to move quickly with sudden turns and shifts.

15. to fold, crease, or crush with the fingers.

16. a large marble used for dropping shots.

17. a small tile used in a mosaic.

18. to micturate.






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Dave Cunningham
February 18th, 2016, 05:03 PM
5 and 11 seem a tad silly ...

Dave

On Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 12:49:51 PM UTC-5, Dodi Schultz wrote:

> The 18 definitions of PINGLE below all claim to come from a dictionary,
> but only one of them actually did. Can you find it? Cast your votes for the
> two you think most likely. Do so publicly, by reply to this message.
>
> One exception: If you now recognize the real def, you must recuse
> yourself: Don't reply publicly. Do e-mail me and let me know.
>
> The deadline for casting your votes:
>
> *Saturday 20 February*, 9 a.m. EST, which is:
> 6 a.m. PST
> 8 a.m. CST
> 2 p.m. GMT
> 3 p.m. CET
> *Sunday 21 February*:
> 1 a.m. AEST
> 3 a.m. NZST
>
> —Dodi
>
>
> 1. [Archaic] pink.
>
> 2. a fingernail or toenail extension.
>
> 3. to act ineptly or inefficiently; bungle.
>
> 4. a children's game, similar to hopscotch.
>
> 5. a bell used to give warning of approach in bear country.
>
> 6. a primitive wooden game with pegs and a board with holes.
>
> 7. [Chiefly Scottish] to dawdle or trifle, especially with one's food.
>
> 8. a frying-pan used to cook bannocks (Sc) and biscuits (USA) over an
> open fire.
>
> 9. a solid metal or wooden device used on traditionally rigged sailing
> vessels to secure lines of running rigging. Also called a "belaying pin."
>
> 10. formerly, a piece of cloth serving as a saddle; hence, a soft pad
> beneath a saddletree to prevent chafing.
>
> 11. a juvenile penguin, esp. *Eudyptula minor* (little penguin or fairy
> penguin).
>
> 12. a wild watermelon, *Citrullus lanatus*, native to N. America.
>
> 13. [Obs. or dial.] a snowflake; a snowdrop (*Galanthus* spp.).
>
> 14. to move quickly with sudden turns and shifts.
>
> 15. to fold, crease, or crush with the fingers.
>
> 16. a large marble used for dropping shots.
>
> 17. a small tile used in a mosaic.
>
> 18. to micturate.
>
>
>

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Johnb - co.uk
February 18th, 2016, 05:10 PM
#3 and #16 for me please
*
JohnnyB*

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nancygoat
February 18th, 2016, 11:50 PM
I'll take 3 and 11.

Nancy

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Guerri Stevens
February 19th, 2016, 06:52 AM
I vote for 15 and 18.

Guerri
On 2/18/2016 12:49 PM, Dodi Schultz wrote:
>
> 15. to fold, crease, or crush with the fingers.
>
> 18. to micturate.
>
>
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
> Version: 2015.0.6189 / Virus Database: 4530/11635 - Release Date: 02/16/16
>
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Efrem Mallach
February 19th, 2016, 09:49 AM
I’ll try the Scots, 7 and 8.

Efrem

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
> On Feb 18, 2016, at 12:49 PM, Dodi Schultz <DodiSchultz (AT) verizon (DOT) net> wrote:
>
> The 18 definitions of PINGLE below all claim to come from a dictionary, but only one of them actually did. Can you find it? Cast your votes for the two you think most likely. Do so publicly, by reply to this message.
>
> One exception: If you now recognize the real def, you must recuse yourself: Don't reply publicly. Do e-mail me and let me know.
>
> The deadline for casting your votes:
>
> Saturday 20 February, 9 a.m. EST, which is:
> 6 a.m. PST
> 8 a.m. CST
> 2 p.m. GMT
> 3 p.m. CET
> Sunday 21 February:
> 1 a.m. AEST
> 3 a.m. NZST
>
> —Dodi
>
>
> 7. [Chiefly Scottish] to dawdle or trifle, especially with one's food.
>
> 8. a frying-pan used to cook bannocks (Sc) and biscuits (USA) over an open fire.

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Paul Keating
February 19th, 2016, 11:14 AM
7 & 14
On 18 Feb 2016 18:49, "Dodi Schultz" <DodiSchultz (AT) verizon (DOT) net> wrote:

> The 18 definitions of PINGLE below all claim to come from a dictionary,
> but only one of them actually did. Can you find it? Cast your votes for the
> two you think most likely. Do so publicly, by reply to this message.
>
> One exception: If you now recognize the real def, you must recuse
> yourself: Don't reply publicly. Do e-mail me and let me know.
>
> The deadline for casting your votes:
>
> *Saturday 20 February*, 9 a.m. EST, which is:
> 6 a.m. PST
> 8 a.m. CST
> 2 p.m. GMT
> 3 p.m. CET
> *Sunday 21 February*:
> 1 a.m. AEST
> 3 a.m. NZST
>
> —Dodi
>
>
> 1. [Archaic] pink.
>
> 2. a fingernail or toenail extension.
>
> 3. to act ineptly or inefficiently; bungle.
>
> 4. a children's game, similar to hopscotch.
>
> 5. a bell used to give warning of approach in bear country.
>
> 6. a primitive wooden game with pegs and a board with holes.
>
> 7. [Chiefly Scottish] to dawdle or trifle, especially with one's food.
>
> 8. a frying-pan used to cook bannocks (Sc) and biscuits (USA) over an
> open fire.
>
> 9. a solid metal or wooden device used on traditionally rigged sailing
> vessels to secure lines of running rigging. Also called a "belaying pin."
>
> 10. formerly, a piece of cloth serving as a saddle; hence, a soft pad
> beneath a saddletree to prevent chafing.
>
> 11. a juvenile penguin, esp. *Eudyptula minor* (little penguin or fairy
> penguin).
>
> 12. a wild watermelon, *Citrullus lanatus*, native to N. America.
>
> 13. [Obs. or dial.] a snowflake; a snowdrop (*Galanthus* spp.).
>
> 14. to move quickly with sudden turns and shifts.
>
> 15. to fold, crease, or crush with the fingers.
>
> 16. a large marble used for dropping shots.
>
> 17. a small tile used in a mosaic.
>
> 18. to micturate.
>
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Dixonary" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to dixonary+unsubscribe (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com.
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>

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Steve Graham
February 19th, 2016, 11:21 AM
7 and 11, please



Steve Graham

"Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."

Ralph Waldo Emerson


7. [Chiefly Scottish] to dawdle or trifle, especially with one's food.

11. a juvenile penguin, esp. Eudyptula minor (little penguin or fairy penguin).



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Shani Naylor
February 19th, 2016, 04:25 PM
I'll try 3 & 7.

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Daniel Widdis
February 19th, 2016, 04:27 PM
I don't believe any, but I'll try the pink snowflake.

1 and 13.

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Tony Abell
February 19th, 2016, 05:40 PM
The two most plausible: 3 and 16:

> 3. to act ineptly or inefficiently; bungle.

> 16. a large marble used for dropping shots.

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—Keith Hale—
February 19th, 2016, 11:30 PM
My votes got to 7 & 16. Cheers.
-Keith-

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Jim Hart
February 20th, 2016, 07:24 AM
I'll take the not so popular 16 and the unpopular 17

Jim


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Dodi Schultz
February 20th, 2016, 09:51 AM
This has been, shall we say, an interesting round. Not to keep you in suspense: We had a high-scoring tie, but there was no problem picking the next dealer, and no reference to the rolling scores needed, since one high scorer is unable to deal—that being the dictionary, the submitter of PINGLE def #7. Our other high scorer, Shani Naylor (#16), will be dealing Round 2686. Details below.

—Dodi



&nbsp;1. [Archaic] pink.
By Dave Cunningham, who voted for 5 and 11
Vote from Widdis / Score: 1

&nbsp;2. a fingernail or toenail extension.
By Mike Shefler, who voted for 8 and 12
Vote from Bourne / Score: 1

&nbsp;3. to act ineptly or inefficiently; bungle.
By Chris Carson, who didn't vote
Votes from Abell, Barrs, Lodge, Naylor, Shepherdson / Score: 5

&nbsp;4. a children's game, similar to hopscotch.
By Guerri Stevens, who voted for 15 and 18
Vote from Madnick / Score: 1

&nbsp;5. a bell used to give warning of approach in bear country.
By Tim Bourne, who voted for 2 and 9
Vote from Cunningham / Score: 1

&nbsp;6. a primitive wooden game with pegs and a board with holes.
By Keith Hale, who voted for *7* and 16
Vote from Madnick / Score: *3*

&nbsp;7. [Chiefly Scottish] to dawdle or trifle, especially with one's food.
By Merriam-Webster Online
Votes from Graham, Hale, Keating, Mallach, Naylor, Weltz / Score: D6

&nbsp;8. a frying-pan used to cook bannocks (Sc) and biscuits (USA) over an open fire.
By Johnny Barrs, who voted for 3 and 16
Votes from Mallach, Shefler / Score: 2

&nbsp;9. a solid metal or wooden device used on traditionally rigged sailing vessels to secure lines of running rigging. Also called a "belaying pin."
By Steve Graham, who voted for *7* and 11
Votes from Bourne and Weltz / Score: *4*

10. formerly, a piece of cloth serving as a saddle; hence, a soft pad beneath a saddletree to prevent chafing.
By Dan Widdis, who voted for 1 and 13
No votes / Score: 0

11. a juvenile penguin, esp. Eudyptula minor (little penguin or fairy penguin).
By Jim Hart, who voted for 16 and 17
Votes from Cunningham, Graham, Lodge, Shepherdson / Score: 4

12. a wild watermelon, Citrullus lanatus, native to N. America.
By Nancy Shepherdson, who voted for 3 and 11
Vote from Shefler / Score: 1

13. [Obs. or dial.] a snowflake; a snowdrop (Galanthus spp.).
By Paul Keating, who voted for *7* and 14
Vote from Widdis / Score: *3*

14. to move quickly with sudden turns and shifts.
By Judy Madnick, who voted for 4 and 6
Vote from Keating / Score: 1

15. to fold, crease, or crush with the fingers.
By Tim Lodge, who voted for 3 and 11
Vote from Stevens / Score: 1

16. a large marble used for dropping shots.
By Shani Naylor, who voted for 3 and *7*
Votes from Abell, Barrs, Hale, Hart / Score: *6*

17. a small tile used in a mosaic.
By Efrem Mallach, who voted for *7* and 8
Vote from Hart / Score: *3*

18. to micturate.
By Dick Weltz, who voted for *7* and 9
Vote from Stevens / Score: *3*











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