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View Full Version : [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference


Dodi Schultz
December 20th, 2015, 12:50 PM
This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi




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Steve Graham
December 20th, 2015, 02:07 PM
First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc.

Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.

Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the messages that have been rejected as spam? That’s usually where the filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)

Steve Graham

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. Albert Einstein



From: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com [mailto:dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com] On Behalf Of Dodi Schultz
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
To: Dixonary
Subject: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference




This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi

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Judy Madnick
December 20th, 2015, 02:12 PM
She may also be exposing her email address to potential spammers more than
you do, Dodi.

Judy
On Dec 20, 2015 2:07 PM, "Steve Graham" <sdgraham (AT) duckswild (DOT) com> wrote:

> First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the
> e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many
> people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft,
> Yahoo, etc.
>
> Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do
> not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since
> separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my
> email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they
> just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook
> mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.
>
> Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where
> the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an
> efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the
> messages that have been rejected as spam? That’s usually where the
> filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)
>
> Steve Graham
>
> Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different
> results. *Albert Einstein*
>
>
>
> *From:* dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com [mailto:dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com] *On
> Behalf Of *Dodi Schultz
> *Sent:* Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
> *To:* Dixonary
> *Subject:* [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference
>
>
>
>
> This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.
>
> A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and
> we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she
> gets a great deal.
>
> The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an
> e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon
> website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?
>
> —Dodi
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Dixonary" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to dixonary+unsubscribe (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com.
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Dixonary" group.
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> email to dixonary+unsubscribe (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com.
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>

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Tim Lodge
December 20th, 2015, 03:26 PM
Dodi

I agree with Judy. Does you friend have her email address on a personal or other website? If she has, spam robots will have harvested it and it will have been sold on to lots of spammers. The other possibility is that she entered her address in a form on a website whose unscrupulous owners may also have sold it on.

-- Tim

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Dodi Schultz
December 20th, 2015, 03:34 PM
I do have a mailbox at the Verizon site, as does my friend. But as I said, I don't go there to get my mail, since Tbird faithfully does the fetching.

Very occasionally, a notice pops up saying something like, "Thunderbird thinks this message might be a scam." It never is; I get the impression it's just trying to prove that it hasn't dozed off. I just tell it "Never mind!" and go on to open whatever it is, usually a news bulletin to which I've subscribed.

It never so identifies all the "Buy NOW! Sale lasts only till next Tuesday!" stuff. Or the pleas for contributions from outfits to which I've never contributed and whose sites I've never visited.

If Tbird is banishing some other stuff, it's tossing the junk on the way back from its pickup run to Verizon, since no pleas for funds from dethroned Nigerian princes or offers of sexy Russian girls ever reach me. (News that I've won a trip to the Cayman Islands in a contest I never entered does reach my cell phone, but that's another story. There's nobody guarding the phone gate.)

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


On 12/20/2015 2:07 PM, Steve Graham wrote:






First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc.



Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.



Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the messages that have been rejected as spam?&nbsp; That’s usually where the filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)





Steve&nbsp; Graham






=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

















From: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com (mailto:dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com) On Behalf Of Dodi Schultz
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
To: Dixonary
Subject: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference







&nbsp;




This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi









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Dodi Schultz
December 20th, 2015, 03:34 PM
In what way might she be doing that, Judy?

By the way, she uses e-mail considerably less than I do. She checks it once a day, then turns off her computer. Sometimes, once in TWO days. I don't think she visits any websites besides Verizon.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

On 12/20/2015 2:12 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:




She may also be exposing her email address to potential spammers more than you do, Dodi.



Judy



On Dec 20, 2015 2:07 PM, Steve Graham wrote:






First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc.



Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.



Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the messages that have been rejected as spam?&nbsp; That’s usually where the filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)





Steve&nbsp; Graham









=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=













From: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com On Behalf Of Dodi Schultz
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
To: Dixonary
Subject: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference







&nbsp;




This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi



--














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Johnb - co.uk
December 20th, 2015, 03:37 PM
Dodi

it is very likely what Judy says - how much you expose your email
address to spam. I have several accounts but taking just three as an
example.
all three are @john-barrs.co.uk accounts which mean they are using
google as their mail server.
all three are only ever read by TB
One is used specifically only for family and gets no spam at all
One is used for official things and gets a liitle spam maybe one or two
a week (some of my official contacts are not so careful as they should be)
One is used to mail out letters etc to a large number of people world
wide and it gets a fair amount of spam 2-or 3 a day because people
generally are not very careful (As a result of making these contacts I
also have and pay for very strong firewall and antivirus software and I
keep it right up-to-date)

Now...occasionally I do log in on the web and then I can see how much
google has trapped - in essence TB probably gets about 5% of the spam
that is actually sent to me

*JohnnyB*

On 12/20/2015 5:50 PM, Dodi Schultz wrote:
>
> This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.
>
> A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and
> we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she
> says she gets a great deal.
>
> The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an
> e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the
> Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam
> experience?
>
> —Dodi
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Groups "Dixonary" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send
> an email to dixonary+unsubscribe (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com
> <mailto:dixonary+unsubscribe (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com>.
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

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Judy Madnick
December 20th, 2015, 03:39 PM
I have several email addresses, and the one I use for shopping, etc., is the one for which I receive the most spam. Fortunately, these are all Gmail accounts, and rarely does any of the spam make its way to my "in" box.

Judy



Original message
From: "Tim Lodge" <dix (AT) timlodge (DOT) co.uk>
To: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com;
Dated: 12/20/2015 3:26:20 PM
Subject: RE: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference

Dodi

I agree with Judy. Does you friend have her email address on a personal or other website? If she has, spam robots will have harvested it and it will have been sold on to lots of spammers. The other possibility is that she entered her address in a form on a website whose unscrupulous owners may also have sold it on.

-- Tim

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Judy Madnick
December 20th, 2015, 03:45 PM
Dodi,

Does she shop online? Does she have anti-virus/anti-malware programs installed? Has she ever "clicked" on a link without really knowing what it was for?

And does she receive email from anyone who doesn't use blind carbon copy so that her email address may have been shared with (or ended up in additional forwarded messages) until a "bad guy" got ahold of it?

This (silly) poem says it all:

I love receiving email you kindly send to me,
But rather than the "To" field, please use "Bcc."
That protects the privacy of those to whom you send
Your fun and useful messages, I candidly contend.

When you use the "To" field, our address is seen by plenty;
Then when others forward, it's seen by many, many!
Eventually the spammers, with all their little tricks,
Will use our email addresses — and we'll all be in a fix.

So...use the "Bcc" field when sending mail to friends,
And delete all addresses you see from previous sends.
That will keep us safer from those who stalk and spam,
And ensure our friends and neighbors don't end up in a jam.

If you have some questions relating to this chore,
Just send to me an email and I will tell you more.
Thank you for your reading this poem and my request.
I think you will agree that "Bcc" is always best.

— Judy Madnick
Copyright © 2009





Original message
From: "Dodi Schultz" <DodiSchultz (AT) verizon (DOT) net>
To: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com;
Dated: 12/20/2015 3:34:56 PM
Subject: Re: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference



In what way might she be doing that, Judy?

By the way, she uses e-mail considerably less than I do. She checks it once a day, then turns off her computer. Sometimes, once in TWO days. I don't think she visits any websites besides Verizon.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

On 12/20/2015 2:12 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:

She may also be exposing her email address to potential spammers more than you do, Dodi.
Judy
On Dec 20, 2015 2:07 PM, Steve Graham wrote:

First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc.
Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.
Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the messages that have been rejected as spam? That’s usually where the filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)
Steve Graham
=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=



From: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com On Behalf Of Dodi Schultz
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
To: Dixonary
Subject: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference


This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi
--





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Dodi Schultz
December 20th, 2015, 03:47 PM
In answer to your question: No, she has no personal website and AFAIK isn't
a member of any group where her name might be listed. (I, BTW, am in fact a
member of three writers' organizations, and my name's somewhere there,
although presumably not in areas accessible to people without passwords.
I've never received any mail from any non-member who might have extracted
my name from any of those sources.)

As I noted in an earlier response, my friend isn't given to much online
activity. I, OTOH, have happily participated in surveys, have signed on to
a number of forums and subscribe to several furnishers of news.

The only thing I know of that she's involved in and I'm not is Netflix.
Might that explain anything? (I know nothing about how that works.)

—Dodi



On 12/20/2015 3:26 PM, Tim Lodge wrote:
> Dodi
>
> I agree with Judy. Does you friend have her email address on a personal or other website? If she has, spam robots will have harvested it and it will have been sold on to lots of spammers. The other possibility is that she entered her address in a form on a website whose unscrupulous owners may also have sold it on.
>
> -- Tim
>

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Guerri Stevens
December 20th, 2015, 03:57 PM
Interesting discussion. Sometimes I think it would be safer to just
provide a list of senders whose mail you want to accept. I think that
Tbird actually "learns" because for a long time I reported messages from
the People's Pharmacy as "a possible scam" and that has stopped.

There was some email provider, maybe Earthlink or something like that,
that could be set up to deliver mail only from people in your address
book. They would report on anyone they rejected and allow you to add the
person. I forget the details.

Guerri
On 12/20/2015 3:37 PM, Johnb - co.uk wrote:
> Dodi
>
> it is very likely what Judy says - how much you expose your email
> address to spam. I have several accounts but taking just three as an
> example.
> all three are @john-barrs.co.uk accounts which mean they are using
> google as their mail server.
> all three are only ever read by TB
> One is used specifically only for family and gets no spam at all
> One is used for official things and gets a liitle spam maybe one or
> two a week (some of my official contacts are not so careful as they
> should be)
> One is used to mail out letters etc to a large number of people world
> wide and it gets a fair amount of spam 2-or 3 a day because people
> generally are not very careful (As a result of making these contacts I
> also have and pay for very strong firewall and antivirus software and
> I keep it right up-to-date)
>
> Now...occasionally I do log in on the web and then I can see how much
> google has trapped - in essence TB probably gets about 5% of the spam
> that is actually sent to me
>
> *JohnnyB*
>
> On 12/20/2015 5:50 PM, Dodi Schultz wrote:
>>
>> This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.
>>
>> A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon,
>> and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam;
>> she says she gets a great deal.
>>
>> The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use
>> an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the
>> Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam
>> experience?
>>
>> —Dodi
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
>> Groups "Dixonary" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it,
>> send an email to dixonary+unsubscribe (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com
>> <mailto:dixonary+unsubscribe (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com>.
>> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
> Version: 2015.0.6176 / Virus Database: 4489/11218 - Release Date: 12/20/15
>
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Dodi Schultz
December 20th, 2015, 04:02 PM
Well! We have a hitherto unrevealed bard among us! Nicely put (small picky point: "many" doesn't rhyme with "plenty"). :-)&nbsp;

I don't think she clicks on links blindly. She may indeed have received e-mail from known people who haven't used bcc (haven't we all? but that doesn't seem to have affected me, and I've had a lot of those).

Oh, well. Perhaps it's her Netflix subscription. And perhaps my Tbird simply removes a lot of spam before it delivers the real mail to my inbox and modestly doesn't mention it. If the latter, that just increases my affection for it. :-)

Anyway: Thanks to all who responded.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


On 12/20/2015 3:45 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:


body { font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal; margin-top: 40px; margin-left: 20px; }

Dodi,



&nbsp;



Does she&nbsp;shop online? Does she have anti-virus/anti-malware programs installed? Has she ever "clicked" on a link without really knowing what it was for?



&nbsp;



And does she receive email from anyone who doesn't use blind carbon copy so that her email address may have been shared with (or ended up in additional forwarded messages) until a "bad guy" got ahold of it?



&nbsp;



This (silly) poem says it all:



&nbsp;



I love receiving email you kindly send to me,
But rather than the "To" field, please use "Bcc."
That protects the privacy of those to whom you send
Your fun and useful messages, I candidly contend.

When you use the "To" field, our address is seen by plenty;
Then when others forward, it's seen by many, many!
Eventually the spammers, with all their little tricks,
Will use our email addresses — and we'll all be in a fix.

So...use the "Bcc" field when sending mail to friends,
And delete all addresses you see from previous sends.
That will keep us safer from those who stalk and spam,
And ensure our friends and neighbors don't end up in a jam.

If you have some questions relating to this chore,
Just send to me an email and I will tell you more.
Thank you for your reading this poem and my request.
I think you will agree that "Bcc" is always best.

— Judy Madnick
Copyright &copy; 2009


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


&nbsp;



&nbsp;



&nbsp;




From: "Dodi Schultz"
To: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com (mailto:dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com);
Dated: 12/20/2015 3:34:56 PM
Subject: Re: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference




In what way might she be doing that, Judy?

By the way, she uses e-mail considerably less than I do. She checks it once a day, then turns off her computer. Sometimes, once in TWO days. I don't think she visits any websites besides Verizon.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

On 12/20/2015 2:12 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:




She may also be exposing her email address to potential spammers more than you do, Dodi.



Judy



=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=




On Dec 20, 2015 2:07 PM, Steve Graham wrote:






First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc.



Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.



Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the messages that have been rejected as spam?&nbsp; That’s usually where the filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)





Steve&nbsp; Graham









=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=













From: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com On Behalf Of Dodi Schultz
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
To: Dixonary
Subject: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference







&nbsp;




This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi



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France International/Mike Shefler
December 20th, 2015, 04:03 PM
it was very annoying. You couldn't send email to someone not in their
address book without first filling out a form, which would then be sent
to the addressee who could then accept or reject you.

On 12/20/2015 3:57 PM, Guerri Stevens wrote:
> There was some email provider, maybe Earthlink or something like that,
> that could be set up to deliver mail only from people in your address
> book. They would report on anyone they rejected and allow you to add
> the person. I forget the details.

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France International/Mike Shefler
December 20th, 2015, 04:05 PM
Dodi,

There are so many ways to get on a spammer's list it would be practically impossible to enumerate them. My email (Tbird, private ISP) is about 2/3 spam - I just live with it.

--Mike




On 12/20/2015 4:02 PM, Dodi Schultz wrote:




Well! We have a hitherto unrevealed bard among us! Nicely put (small picky point: "many" doesn't rhyme with "plenty"). :-)*

I don't think she clicks on links blindly. She may indeed have received e-mail from known people who haven't used bcc (haven't we all? but that doesn't seem to have affected me, and I've had a lot of those).

Oh, well. Perhaps it's her Netflix subscription. And perhaps my Tbird simply removes a lot of spam before it delivers the real mail to my inbox and modestly doesn't mention it. If the latter, that just increases my affection for it. :-)

Anyway: Thanks to all who responded.

—Dodi


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On 12/20/2015 3:45 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:


body { font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal; margin-top: 40px; margin-left: 20px; }

Dodi,



*



Does she*shop online? Does she have anti-virus/anti-malware programs installed? Has she ever "clicked" on a link without really knowing what it was for?



*



And does she receive email from anyone who doesn't use blind carbon copy so that her email address may have been shared with (or ended up in additional forwarded messages) until a "bad guy" got ahold of it?



*



This (silly) poem says it all:



*



I love receiving email you kindly send to me,
But rather than the "To" field, please use "Bcc."
That protects the privacy of those to whom you send
Your fun and useful messages, I candidly contend.

When you use the "To" field, our address is seen by plenty;
Then when others forward, it's seen by many, many!
Eventually the spammers, with all their little tricks,
Will use our email addresses — and we'll all be in a fix.

So...use the "Bcc" field when sending mail to friends,
And delete all addresses you see from previous sends.
That will keep us safer from those who stalk and spam,
And ensure our friends and neighbors don't end up in a jam.

If you have some questions relating to this chore,
Just send to me an email and I will tell you more.
Thank you for your reading this poem and my request.
I think you will agree that "Bcc" is always best.

— Judy Madnick
Copyright © 2009


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


*



*



*




From: "Dodi Schultz"
To: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) .com (mailto:dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com);
Dated: 12/20/2015 3:34:56 PM
Subject: Re: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference




In what way might she be doing that, Judy?

By the way, she uses e-mail considerably less than I do. She checks it once a day, then turns off her computer. Sometimes, once in TWO days. I don't think she visits any websites besides Verizon.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

On 12/20/2015 2:12 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:




She may also be exposing her email address to potential spammers more than you do, Dodi.



Judy



=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=




On Dec 20, 2015 2:07 PM, Steve Graham wrote:






First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc.



Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.



Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the messages that have been rejected as spam?* That’s usually where the filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)





Steve* Graham









=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=













From: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com (mailto:dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com) On Behalf Of Dodi Schultz
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
To: Dixonary
Subject: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference







*




This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi



--












*





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Judy Madnick
December 20th, 2015, 04:10 PM
Poetic license....!

Judy



Original message
From: "Dodi Schultz" <DodiSchultz (AT) verizon (DOT) net>
To: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com;
Dated: 12/20/2015 4:02:38 PM
Subject: Re: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference


Well! We have a hitherto unrevealed bard among us! Nicely put (small picky point: "many" doesn't rhyme with "plenty"). :-)

I don't think she clicks on links blindly. She may indeed have received e-mail from known people who haven't used bcc (haven't we all? but that doesn't seem to have affected me, and I've had a lot of those).

Oh, well. Perhaps it's her Netflix subscription. And perhaps my Tbird simply removes a lot of spam before it delivers the real mail to my inbox and modestly doesn't mention it. If the latter, that just increases my affection for it. :-)

Anyway: Thanks to all who responded.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


On 12/20/2015 3:45 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:

Dodi,

Does she shop online? Does she have anti-virus/anti-malware programs installed? Has she ever "clicked" on a link without really knowing what it was for?

And does she receive email from anyone who doesn't use blind carbon copy so that her email address may have been shared with (or ended up in additional forwarded messages) until a "bad guy" got ahold of it?

This (silly) poem says it all:

I love receiving email you kindly send to me,
But rather than the "To" field, please use "Bcc."
That protects the privacy of those to whom you send
Your fun and useful messages, I candidly contend.

When you use the "To" field, our address is seen by plenty;
Then when others forward, it's seen by many, many!
Eventually the spammers, with all their little tricks,
Will use our email addresses — and we'll all be in a fix.

So...use the "Bcc" field when sending mail to friends,
And delete all addresses you see from previous sends.
That will keep us safer from those who stalk and spam,
And ensure our friends and neighbors don't end up in a jam.

If you have some questions relating to this chore,
Just send to me an email and I will tell you more.
Thank you for your reading this poem and my request.
I think you will agree that "Bcc" is always best.

— Judy Madnick
Copyright © 2009

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=







From: "Dodi Schultz"
To: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com;
Dated: 12/20/2015 3:34:56 PM
Subject: Re: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference



In what way might she be doing that, Judy?

By the way, she uses e-mail considerably less than I do. She checks it once a day, then turns off her computer. Sometimes, once in TWO days. I don't think she visits any websites besides Verizon.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

On 12/20/2015 2:12 PM, Judy Madnick wrote:

She may also be exposing her email address to potential spammers more than you do, Dodi.
Judy
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

On Dec 20, 2015 2:07 PM, Steve Graham wrote:

First of all, the ISP (internet service provider) is not necessarily the e-mail service provider. Most ISPs do provide email capability, but many people, such as myself, opt for other providers, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc.
Some email providers, e.g. Google, have strong spam filtering. Others do not, since it involves a huge amount of work on their part, since separating spam from valid messages is a daunting task. I used to get my email via my domain and web page provider, (Network Solutions) but they just let everything through, most of which was not caught by my Outlook mail client. Therefore, Google now handles my email.
Since I use neither Verizon nor TBird, I cannot offer any help on where the filtering on your account might be taking place. TBird may well have an efficient anti-spam filter. Do you have some place to go to see the messages that have been rejected as spam? That’s usually where the filtering is done. (Even the best of filters make “mistakes.”)
Steve Graham
=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=



From: dixonary (AT) googlegroups (DOT) com On Behalf Of Dodi Schultz
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2015 09:51
To: Dixonary
Subject: [Dixonary] OT: Same ISP, spam difference


This isn't a computer problem, just something I'm curious about.

A friend and I are both provided with internet service by Verizon, and we're in the same geographic area. I hardly ever get any spam; she says she gets a great deal.

The only e-mail difference: Tbird collects my mail; she doesn't use an e-mail client but goes and picks hers up from her mailbox at the Verizon website. Does that account for the difference in our spam experience?

—Dodi
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Dodi Schultz
December 20th, 2015, 04:16 PM
Well, there goes my Tbird-the-faithful conclusion.

I guess we'll never know. As I said, I was just curious.

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


On 12/20/2015 4:05 PM, Mike Shefler wrote:


Dodi,

There are so many ways to get on a spammer's list it would be practically impossible to enumerate them. My email (Tbird, private ISP) is about 2/3 spam - I just live with it.

--Mike

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=



On 12/20/2015 4:02 PM, Dodi Schultz wrote:




[. . . ]

Oh, well. Perhaps it's her Netflix subscription. And perhaps my Tbird simply removes a lot of spam before it delivers the real mail to my inbox and modestly doesn't mention it. If the latter, that just increases my affection for it. :-)

Anyway: Thanks to all who responded.

—Dodi







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Jim Hart
December 20th, 2015, 08:34 PM
Wiser heads have already responded. I would only add that Tbird has a
variety of spam options that may be protecting you more than you realise,
plus options on what to do with spam if it finds any. Look under
Tools>Options or Tools>Account settings if you can be bothered.

Jim

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Dodi Schultz
December 20th, 2015, 09:14 PM
Yeah, there's that "Thunderbird thinks this could be. . ." thing there. As
I said, it never turns out to be actual spam. Whatever else it's doing,
it's doing silently and efficiently. And I'm grateful. :-)

—Dodi


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


On 12/20/2015 8:34 PM, Jim Hart wrote:
>
> Wiser heads have already responded. I would only add that Tbird has a
> variety of spam options that may be protecting you more than you realise,
> plus options on what to do with spam if it finds any. Look under
> Tools>Options or Tools>Account settings if you can be bothered.
>
> Jim
>

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